Trull, Margaret


Instructions

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    Interview 1, Part 1 with Margaret Trull (Interviewer Iris Howell-de Nijs)

    Interview 1, Part 2 with Margaret Trull (Interviewer Iris Howell-de Nijs)

    Interview 2, Part 1 with Margaret Trull (Interviewer Iris Howell-de Nijs)


Biography
Margaret Louise Trull (who went by “Peggy”) was born on July 11, 1919, in Davidson County, Tennessee, to Herbert Mortimer DeLan and Margaret Deering Dismukes Trull. Margaret's father worked as a foreman in the cutting room of the J. W. Carter & Company shoe factory in Nashville, Tennessee by 1919. By 1930, Herbert Trull had passed away, and Margaret's family moved into the house of Margaret's mother's grandparents in Nashville.

Margaret L. Trull entered military service during World War II on July 18, 1942, when she was inducted at Fort Olgethorpe, Georgia. Trull served in the Women’s Army Corps (WAC), the women’s branch of the U.S. Army, and attended the WAC Training Center in Daytona Beach, Florida, for her basic training. She was assigned to the 5203rd WAC Detachment, which would be stationed in Port Moresby and Biak Island, New Guinea. Trull would be transferred to the 5204th WAAC (Women's Army Air Corps) Detachment on Leyte Island, the Philippines.

Trull served until 1946, reaching the rank of Captain during her military career. Later in life, Trull came to live in Durham, N.C. Margaret L. Trull died on April 13, 2011, and was buried in Saint Matthews Episcopal Church Cemetery in Hillsborough, N.C.